Topic: Politics

Labour ushers in new leaders

By Heta Gardiner
  • Wellington

Jacinda Ardern is Labour's new leader following the resignation of former leader Andrew Little. For the first time in the party's history, a Māori has been elected to the party's deputy leadership.

Things started off on a very sombre note for Labour, with their leader Andrew Little resigning. But as one falls, from the ashes rises a female and a Māori, Jacinda Ardern becoming the new leader with Kelvin Davis as the deputy. But the question remains, is this all too little too late?

Labour ushers in its new leaders.

Kelvin Davis says, “This is a significant day for Māoridom. This is the first time in the party's history, a Māori has been elected to the party's deputy leadership. It's a great day.”

The leadership made the huge call overnight.

They are the new leaders after Andrew Little resigned this morning.

Andrew Little says, "In the end, a leader has to take responsibility. I have and I do.

Jacinda Ardern has long since been touted as a future leader of the party, but her escalation to the top job has come much earlier than expected.

Her deputy will be Kelvin Davis, the first ever Māori speaker to be in such a high leadership position in the party.

He also holds the seat of Te Tai Tokerau and is the spokesperson for Māori Development.

So will this pull his focus away from winning Te Tai Tokerau? 

"The entire country and Te Tai Tokerau are my main focus," says Davis.

The Māori Party is hopeful that the change in leadership will help build a relationship between the parties.

However, the new deputy leader has a message for them.

Davis says, "The Māori Party will have to up their game if they want to work with us."

Te Ururoa Flavell responded by saying, “I would suggest that they up their game because they're not looking very good at the moment.

The party has new faces at the helm and a new brand, but we are still to see whether or not the new Labour will appeal to its voters.